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Deportation within General Government


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Testimony of Jerzy Pawlak

[...]  After two days, we were packed into uncovered, freight wagons. We rode for what felt like entire centuries, stopping mostly outside cities and only for brief moments. We could not even get out for a moment to stretch our legs. Suddenly the train stopped; it was night. We heard the deep beating of far-off explosions. Someone exclaimed, "I recognize it; it's Sandomierz!" Squeezed into the overloaded wagon, without space for movement, we were numb.  [...]

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Testimony of Jerzy Czajkowski

[...]  On the next day around 4 p.m. we stopped at the station Charsznica-Miechów, from where peasants' horse-wagons took us to the nearby villages. My family and Mr. "Siekierzyński" were located in the village of Wysocice. I was invited to live in the house of a young (around 27 years old) Mr. Czekaj, who worked on his farm together with his mother and younger sister.  [...]

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Testimony of Jacek Fedorowicz

[...]  I retain one nice remembrance from the train trip. The RGO organization (Rada Główna Opiekuńcza or Central Welfare Council, a Polish organization existing legally during the occupation, distributing food and basic help to displaced persons) gave us some milk and barley soup (krupnik). Since that day for several years krupnik became my favorite soup. And maybe one more nice reminiscence. The carriages were of the cargo type, without roof but each had a little shed on the outer side of the carriage with a German soldier in it guarding the people, armed of course.  [...]

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Testimony of Małgorzata Stępińska-Winckler

[...]  Next day we have been forced into the square in between the halls, where the Germans were about to perform the selection. We were afraid that we might be separated but we managed to stay together. We were ordered to join a huge group of people, who after several hours have all been loaded on a newly arrived freight train. I don't remember us being provided with any food during that process.  [...]

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Testimony of Stanisław Korytowski

[...]  On the evening they put us on coal-carrying type of carriages and the train takes off. The carriages lack roof, which enables me to watch the upper floors of the buildings we pass as well as the stations. I can see a boy covering a window with a blanket - a picture of a relatively normal life, without shelters, basements and bombs. How long ago it was! I have to run away! But how? The carriage door is barred from outside but there is no roof and the train is currently moving slower as it approaches an embankment.  [...]

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Testimony of Ludmiła Niedbalska

[...]  We headed out at dusk. Again the train switched tracks, guesses, what direction would we finally go in: Brwinów, Milanówek, Żyrardów. As we passed stations, there were gatherings of people on the platforms, Germans with their guns directed at the wagons. Skierniewice. Again those small groups of people. When we begin to slow down, the groups disperse and people run in a line along the wagons. They stretch their hands out to us, holding something. They throw things at us randomly - bread, apples. Whoever catches something is lucky. The train stops. People give us food, they pour liquid from pitchers into dishes that are stretched out toward them, hot coffee, they exchange cups for empty ones. They run on the platform as fast as they can, in order to hand out the food as quickly as possible. People in the wagons give them pieces of paper with information, addresses, informing that a certain person is alive. The people on the platform call out that they are taking us to Kieleckie Province, that we should not worry, that we would survive, that they are coming from the West, and they are coming from the East, soon.  [...]

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Testimony of Elżbieta Żakowicz-Prejzner

[...]  What I do remember is only the selection moment, when the flat wagons were already there, open, and people were being divided, selected again. There were still some men among us, so they were being taken away, families were being split. Mum and us were not separated from each other - we were loaded onto the wagon together. And so we travelled crammed, in an awful crush.  [...]

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Testimony of Eugeniusz Spiechowicz

[...]  After several (two or three) days we were directed to a transport the destination of which was, as we have later learned, the concentration camp. On our way to the ramp a young German soldier overseeing the transport said to my mother in German "mother, come" took her by her hand and led her to pavillion VIII known to be the pavillion of liberty. My mother who knew German told him that she is with her juvenile son wounded in the bombardment of Warsaw. The soldier took also my hand and escorted me to the same pavillion.  [...]

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Testimony of Andrzej Garlicki

[...]  But there was nothing to do for us because Jędrzejów is a small a small town and the aid from the Central Welfare Council was insufficient. Somehow my family established contact with my aunt on my father's side, his sister who turned out to be staying in Kielce.  [...]

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Testimony of Elżbieta Dankowska-Walas

[...]  I remember that later we found ourselves in such wagons with no windows, with nothing... People said those were cattle-vans. We were terribly cramped there, terribly stuffy, the people were falling down, they were dying and we all were standing...  [...]

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Testimony of Jerzy Ekner

You got into a cart with your grandma and aunt?Yes. The rest of the passangers were unknown to me, apart from the lawyer's wife and his three daughters. We were standing; an armed gendarme appeared in the brakeman's booth; the train moved. Where are we going? Everyone is looking around. They recognize the stations. We pass a station. We cannot see the signs, but it is probably Wochły Station [...]

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Testimony of Andrzej Janowski

[...]  And here my illness started up again. We were riding, certainly the whole night, and I needed to use bathroom; during the ride there was no such possibility _ I remember how father would hold me on the edge of the wagon; he would sit me down on the edge of the wagon of this riding train and he would hold me. Once even, while the train was standing at a stop light, we got out. I do not know who let us out, but someone opened those wagons. We got out, but I was looking at the stop light with its red light and I was terrified that the train would move and that we would remain behind.  [...]

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Testimony of Grażyna Dorota Duchniak

[...]  Since it was cramped in the carts, a very thick, several inches, board was placed on two bricks, on which a number of persons slept while seated, while I put my legs under this board - mama found a place for me, so I could sleep on the floor curled up, with my legs under this board.  [...]

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Testimony of Halina Wiśniewska

[...]  The next morning they gathered us up on the platform and provided a freight train - open, without a roof. They loaded us up, however many could fit. I just tried to stay near the wall, to lean against it, because sitting down was out of the question, only standing was possible.  [...]

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Testimony of Ewa Kirszenstein-Skrzypczak

[...]  Then we approached the wagons. Human nature is unpredictable - there was no knowing where the trains were going, but still people would crowd on as if they were in for a treasure hunt. One would stand upright all the way in those wagons. They were, luckily, open, the top was open, so it wasn't stuffy inside, but it was just one point, so to speak, for each of us, including grandma, and including Mania.  [...]

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Testimony of Jerzy Kasprzak

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Testimony of Tadeusz Ziomek

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Testimony of Izabella Wciślińska

[...]  Finally, they loaded us up in this open hog cars for transport. Before getting on this rail car I approached the engineer who was operating this train and asked him to slow down right after Pruszków, since I have family there. The train really did travel very slowly after Pruszków, I even managed to pour a bit milk into the mouths of two children, I wrapped up my daughter tightly in the sleeping bag and decided to jump from the train.  [...]

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Testimony of Andrzej Gracjan Flaszczyński

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Testimony of Zbigniew Badowski

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Testimony of Wanda Łabuzińska

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Testimony of Jadwiga Kowejsza

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Testimony of Stefan Wojciech Niesłuchowski

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Testimony of Ewa Osiecka

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Testimony of Elżbieta Uszyńska

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Testimony of Janusz Kosk

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Testimony of jadwiga Szczęścik-Perucka

After two days Germans gathered us and placed in cattle carts. The carts were very dirty and had no roof. We didn't know where the train was taking us. A German soldier gave my sister a little can of milk. She was very happy, because she wanted give it to me. But when we got on the train we saw a woman with a little baby, maybe six months old. So my mom gave the milk to the other woman, as I was [...]

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Testimony of Zbigniew Zmarzlik

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Testimony of Zygmunt Walter

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Testimony of Leszek Łacheta

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Testimony of Bolesław Oleksiak

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Testimony of Aniela Czarnecka

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Testimony of Jadwiga Sawczuk

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Testimony of Jadwiga Kazimierska (Litwin)

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Testimony of Wiesław Zorgier

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Testimony of Stefan Marczak

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Testimony of Jadwiga Szmidt

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Testimony of Teresa Wiza

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Testimony of Paweł Ambrożewicz

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Testimony of Julia Marcela Dyakowska

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Testimony of Michalina Walter-Horst

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Testimony of Wojciech Prośniewski

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Copyright © Muzeum Warszawy :: 2007

   
  The project is implemented by the Museum of Warsaw in cooperation with the State Archives of City of Warsaw, and the Niedersachsische Gedenkstatten Foundation