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Oral account in full


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Testimony of Aleksandra Diermajer-Sękowska

[...]  Did you decide to go to a POW camp with your sister? Yes. It was in the City-Centre North, we left through Pruszków for Fallingbostel, then to Bergen-Belsen, in December, and to Oberlangen. Please say what the transport was like. We travelled in a cattle car; I don't remember how many of us there were. Surely it was more comfortable for the women, because they are shorter, nearly all of them could lie down. There were short breaks to get out. We cut out a hole in the wagon to pour out urine.  [...]

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Testimony of Grażyna Dorota Duchniak

[...]  I lived on Hrubieszowska Street 6 apartment 6. Ukrainians threw us out of this apartment. From this same apartment my father went off to war in 1939 and for this reason I lived only with my mother. Since the apartment was large, during the occupation mother operated a scout preschool there; for free, for children from this tenement house.  [...]

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Testimony of Jerzy Ekner

Interview with Jerzy Ekner
Historical Museum of Warsaw
Warsaw, April 20th 2007
Interviewer: Stanisław Maliszewski At the time the Warsaw Uprising had begun you were a nine-year old boy living in the Old Town district.I was living with my grandma at 17 Miodowa Street, at number 14 on the first floor. Today that's the seat of the Warsaw archbishops. At the time building had apartments [...]

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Testimony of Marta Gadomska-Juskowiak

Interview of Marta Gadomska-Juskowiak
DOB. 24.07.1931 r.
Warsaw, 26.03.2008
with Stanisław Maliszewski
___________________________________________________________________________ When the Warsaw Rising broke out, you were a thirteen year-old girl and living in the centre of Warsaw.             Yes, on 4 Ogrodowa Street. I remember this day, it was a bit hazy, hot, but [...]

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Testimony of Andrzej Garlicki

[...]  Before the war I lived with my parents on Chmielna Street that is in the center of Warsaw. But frankly speaking I don't remember much - practically nothing. In 1939 my father, who was a lawyer was drafted as lieutenant and after the September campaign found himself in the oflag (German camp for higher-rank POWs). At that time my mother and I moved to Żoliborz (northern part of Warsaw) to stay with my grandparents on the mother side and her three or four year younger sister. This was a big four room apartment which my grandfather bought before the war with two really large rooms. My grandfather was a judge. The first thing I do remember is when we moved to my grandparents' place.  [...]

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Testimony of Andrzej Janowski

[...]  During the occupation and during the Uprising I lived together with my parents at 12 Noakowskiego St. It was a huge old house from the beginning of the last century. And there with the whole family we survived the Uprising, except for the one short period when we were evacuated because the Warsaw Polytechnic was captured by the Germans. At that time women and children had to leave the building but we came back later. We were there to the very end, to the last days - we left on October 2 as almost last, together with our whole family.  [...]

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Testimony of Leszek Kazanowski

[...]  There was no mode of transportation, nothing, and everything that we had in our hands, two children, one at the age of 9, the other at the age of 12, my cousin who went with us was I think as young as 6 years old because she did not go to school yet - and so just looking out for these children was a problem, not to mention caring for my older grandma.  [...]

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Testimony of Wiesław Kępiński

[...]  Mother, in that madness, was repeating in despair: "They are going to kill us; they are going to kill us; they are going to kills us." I was even trying to ask the German who was leading us to not kill us... Clearly he probably did not understand me, but that did not matter at all... I even grabbed him by the sleeve... And I walked last in line, as far as I remember. And this is precisely an example of chance, as they say it: one chance in a million. Because this row of people had a certain order to it, so most of the people at the front were walking westward, but I was right by the path which headed toward the embankment.  [...]

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Testimony of Ewa Kirszenstein-Skrzypczak

[...]  Then we approached the wagons. Human nature is unpredictable - there was no knowing where the trains were going, but still people would crowd on as if they were in for a treasure hunt. One would stand upright all the way in those wagons. They were, luckily, open, the top was open, so it wasn't stuffy inside, but it was just one point, so to speak, for each of us, including grandma, and including Mania. The train went on, they refused to let anybody out to satisfy any kind of needs... So we went on and on... Luckily, it started to rain and we could gather water to some bowl, to have a drink. Germans didn't let us out... A loaf of bread came from somewhere above...  [...]

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Testimony of Tadeusz Klemiński

[...]  All the time during the occupation I lived in Wawer, we were occupying a basement in the house which still exists. This is at the cross-roads at Bronisława Czecha St. in the place where one can see such a tall house. We stayed there throughout the occupation, except for the period when the Germans drove us away at the time when the front was closing.  [...]

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Testimony of Jadwiga Kołodziejska-Jedynak

[...]  I remember one thing that made an impression on my entire life. Our neighbour sat next to us, whose daughter had recently given birth. This daughter went to the doctor or somewhere else, I no longer remember and didn't make it back home. And that grandmother was stuck with this small infant. The child was maybe three weeks old - in any event still being nursed, because not even an infant, so freshly born. Well something had to be given to this child, because even that grandmother gave - mother wrapped up one of those candies that my "crazy" sister rescued in a cleanish rag, and that child sucked, because there was no milk. But the whole time, it whimpered, the entire time. Such a child has to have water, has to have something to drink - because it was dehydrated. All of us ended up watching the child's death. Because we couldn't make a move - whoever occupied a place wasn't allowed to move from this place. This was terrible. So many years have passed, [but] I still remember that grandmother who cuddled that child to her breasts - because it wanted to cuddle up to some warmth. And it died before our eyes.  [...]

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Testimony of Janina Loth-Borkowska

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Testimony of Eulalia Matusiak-Rudak

[...]  On 10 August in the afternoon the Germans came and ordered us to leave, you could take a few things, then we could go to the apartment. As soon as we entered and approached the window, something crashed in the corner of the window. Evidently someone was observing and even fired at the widow. A container of marmalade I bought stood in the window, and it had become so hot in the August sun that it expanded and flowed onto this window and on the floor. I first saw this on the floor and thought it was someone's blood, but it was marmalade.  [...]

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Testimony of Idalia Olszewska-Klemińska

[...]  Wawer was a suburb of Warsaw. Very close-by. Now it is part of Warsaw, but at the time it was in the suburbs of Praga. It was a storied building, made from brick, it was even rather sturdy. In the area there were one-family homes, small homes, like there tend to be in the suburbs. And actually, I had been living there since birth. I remember very well how in 1939 - when I was three years old, almost four, three and a half - Dad left for the war. He was a cavalryman, and he was going to war to the Battle of Modlin. I remember this, even though I was so young, but that is because it was very difficult for me and I cried very hard. In 1939, during the war and bombardments - Dad was not around, I had no siblings, I was alone with Mom - we took shelter in a nearby church. Because the church was huge, made of brick, well-built...  [...]

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Testimony of Krzysztof Radlicz

[...]  On the 27th of September Mokotów capitulated. What was happening to you from that moment on? There was severe shooting and we were in open space. The "Społem" house was already in German hands. Through this passage we moved to the corner house in 34 Bałuckiego street and there we survived the capitulation of Mokotów. Before we left, a second lieutenant was passing through the gate of the building in 15 Różana street, such a charming young man full of humour. The Germans moved a cannon on caterpillars and shot at this gate. The lieutenant was hit by a splinter between the eyes. His eyes flowed out and that was a gruesome view. His wounds were immediately dressed of course and he was taken to a sanitary point. I went out in the street where three officers were talking to some Germans and Kalmucks. The main storm was led by Russian troops which placed themselves at the disposal of the Germans. At first we had to remove the barricade, level it, only then the tanks entered. Did you leave home with your mom? Yes, with my mom, my aunt and my grandmother. We walked to Kazimierzowska street, along Kazimierzowska to Madalińskiego street and west through Aleje Niepodległości (avenue) and then in the field and then obliquely towards the allotments near Okęcie (south western part of Warsaw).  [...]

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Testimony of Jadwiga Szczęścik-Perucka

Interview with  Jadwiga Szczęścik-Perucka
born June 18th 1939
Warsaw, February 2nd 2008
Interviewer: Stanisław Maliszewski
___________________________________________________________________________ You were a five year old girl when the Warsaw Uprising broke out. Where did you live at the time? At my grandma's house at 13 Olesińska Street. My sister, 12-years old Barbara, [...]

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Testimony of Michalina Walter-Horst

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Testimony of Zygmunt Walter

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Testimony of Halina Wiśniewska

[...]  That was likely at the end of November. I came home and I didn't know what to do with myself. And since my little one had hernia - when they crushed us so - so I went to a doctor at the Central Welfare Office. He says: "Listen, this is hernia, but we won't do anything now. Here, what are you thinking? When he's one year old and you end up somewhere, then he has to be operated on".  [...]

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Testimony of Elżbieta Żakowicz-Prejzner

[...]  We reached the area of Filtry. On our way we passed burning houses. My attention was drawn by the absence of walls, as if they had been cut off, showing the inside of the rooms, with furniture. And still another purposefully staged scene - like the one with corpses on a rickshaw in Aleja Szucha - a rope and dolls hung out on it. It gave us a shock. That was a deliberate attack on our psyche, I know now. But then all I did was to register: a rickshaw with corpses there and a rope with damaged dolls here.  [...]

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Testimony of Julia Tazbir-Ehrenfeucht

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  The project is implemented by the Museum of Warsaw in cooperation with the State Archives of City of Warsaw, and the Niedersachsische Gedenkstatten Foundation